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Fashion Photography

Fashion Photography

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Fashion photography is one of the most competitive and elusive occupations in the world. For those determined enough to make it happen, it can be incredibly rewarding. Some tips on getting started:

1. DO YOUR RESEARCH

Before you arrange your first shoot, do your homework. Look at the current issues of the major fashion magazines—both European and American editions. Identify the photographs that appeal to you and ask yourself why. Is it primarily the lighting, the location, the clothing, or the type of model? Don’t just look at the photos; read the story. Discover why the clothing is photographed/styled the way it is. Understanding the rationale behind the photographs will help you to create more resonant images.

Tear out examples of lighting, hair, makeup, and locations that you find compelling and keep a file of these images that you can go back and refer to. Trying to imitate or recreate the work of other photographers you respect is a great exercise.

2. BARTER

The fashion industry is competitive, and not just for photographers. Budding hairstylists, makeup artists, models, and stylists will often work for free in exchange for prints or digital images for their portfolios. This cooperation can raise the quality of the final output, but keep the team small to minimize the hassle for everyone involved. Building a team is also good practice in working collaboratively and being able to verbally articulate your vision.

3. BUILD A TEAM

After you’ve been shooting a while, you’ll find that repeatedly working with a trusted stylist, assistant, makeup artist, and hairstylist will greatly increase your productivity. This team will come to understand your aesthetic and working style. That said, it can be good to change your team up occasionally when you have the time and budget to experiment.

4. TAP INTO THE COMMUNITY

Whether it’s a bulletin board at a photo lab or an online group, a community posting can help you immensely. You can find out about studio rentals, equipment for sale, and project opportunities and start building the necessary connections. Fashion design schools are also great places to make connections—if a young designer is passionate enough about his own career, he will often make the details of a shoot come together.

There’s always the chance that the young designer you work with will become the next Todd Oldham. As in any profession, remember and respect the people you work with on your way up.

5. HIT THE AGENCIES

Modeling agencies are often hubs for finding not just models, but also qualified hair and makeup people. Junior bookers often have less experienced models available for test shoots, as well as detailed profiles on a variety of people within the industry.

6. GO ABROAD

The New York fashion industry can be nearly impossible to break into. Agencies often send new models to learn the ropes in Paris or Milan, where vastly more magazines and runway shows make the industry more accessible. Beyond the benefit of increased opportunities, Paris has no shortage of scenic locations.

7. KEEP IT SIMPLE

There are many reasons to keep your equipment load simple. Less experienced models can be intimidated by bulky equipment or high-powered strobes. Complicated setups can render you helpless in the case of malfunctioning equipment. Plus it’s always easier to travel light. A quality digital SLR or film camera, a tripod, and a reflector disk are all the tools you need to begin.

8. LEARN TO USE DAYLIGHT

The standard rules apply: you’re going to get the most flattering light at the magic hours of dawn and dusk. Shooting at noon will produce harsh facial shadows and a relatively flat light on the clothing, but shooting earlier or later in the day, using a reflector to create fill light, is a simple way to yield better results.

9. FIND A STUDIO

While outdoor shots are a simpler way to get started, it eventually becomes necessary to have studio shots in your portfolio as well. It’s important to show your range, and that you know how to work with artificial lighting. Usually, large studio spaces are needed in order to do full-length shots, but acquiring this space can be expensive. Some studios may offer a discount if your schedule is flexible and you’re able to come in if they have a cancellation.

10. IT’S ALL ABOUT THE STORY

A portfolio comprised entirely of singular, disparate images may show your range of technical skills, but that’s about it. What will really set you apart is your ability to create a compelling narrative—think about how you can tell a story in six to eight images or less. Don’t stick to the fashion world when trying to find inspiration. Literature, cinema, and fine art are all good places to find narratives for your projects.

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Getting Paid to Take Beautiful Fashion Pictures and Travel the World.
Envision getting paid to be close to super models, take their pictures and have them published in glossy fashion magazines, such as Harper’s Bazaar, Voque and Elle. You work with the most talented and creative people in the industry.

Your name is renowned internationally. You hang out with the world’s most stylish people: models, fashion designers and socialites. More importantly, you have the potential to earn a six-figure income annually when you’ve reached senior status.

You are always fascinated by photography. In this digital era, almost anybody can literally become a professional photographer and photo editor. As long as you own a reliable camera and photo-editing software, becoming a fashion photographer is within reach.

Yet you might be wondering how break into this highly lucrative artistic business. You’d like to have the lifestyle that many successful fashion photographers enjoy. You might also want to open your own studio, but you’re unsure about where to start.

Relax. We’re here to help you.

Whether you’re an advanced student of photography or a complete novice, our downloadable Breaking Into and Succeeding as a Fashion Photographer is here to provide all the information needed to break into and, eventually, succeed.

Thanks to the fashion-conscious society we live in and the Internet, you can be a fashion photographer wherever you live. Contrary to popular belief, you don’t need to live in Paris, Milan, New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco to earn a good living as a fashion photographer. As long as you live in a city where there are fashion designers, boutiques, retailers and manufacturers, you can live your dream!

A fashion photographer is always in demand because there will always be clothes to market.

For those with entrepreneurial spirit, becoming a fashion photographer is most likely a great fit. Training is available to anyone interested, oftentimes for only very little investment, even if you have never worked as a photographer before. Once you’re ready, you can open your own studio. (Many seasoned photographers even have their studios at home!)

There are many avenues for a fashion photographer to break into this business:

Freelance (without an agent)
Freelance with an agent
Employed by a retailer
Employed by a publication (magazine, book publisher, newspaper, etc.)
Employed by a fashion house
Employed by an advertising company
Employed by a fashion manufacturer
Employed by a direct-mail company
Open your own studio

This eGuide provides insightful formation, advices and tips for anyone who is contemplating in entering the fashion photography industry as well as for seasoned fashion photographers. Numerous hard-to-find resources are included to help you locate pertinent information that will help you achieve your success in this highly lucrative and competitive artistic field.

OK, a fashion photographer is somebody who takes picture of clothes and their models, right? That’s only half true.

A good fashion photographer is more than somebody who takes good pictures. He or she must also have the midas touch to make clothes and their models look their best artistically (and marketable!).

To succeed, he or she must make sure that he or she possesses the technical and artistic skills to ensure a professional ambience in which the team works well together. In short, a fashion photographer is a skilled photographer who possesses the technical and artistic skills needed in creating valuable pictures of clothing by using photographic equipments.

There are several career paths in this field that you can choose based on your strengths and interests. You’re not restricted to working for a fashion magazine or opening your own studio, if that’s not your interest.

Some of the career paths include working for:

Periodicals
Ad agencies
Department stores
Fashion houses
Modeling agencies
Retailers
Catalogues
Galleries
Stock photography agency

Editor-in-Chief Jennie S. Bev and co-author Joshua Isard have talked to many experienced fashion photographers, who are more than happy to share their wisdom. Breaking Into and Succeeding as a Fashion Photographer is simply the best and the most comprehensive self-study guidebook filled with insider information, tips and advice available online.

Experienced contributors who share their wisdom and strategies of fashion photography business in this well-researched eGuide include:

Successful fashion photographers who have worked for well-known international fashion magazines
Successful fashion photographers who own their own photo studios
A fashion photography instructor
A freelance fashion photographer
An agent

Fashion Photography Guide

fashion photography
A Career in Fashion Photography

Fashion photography to many entails dreams of huge paychecks and a glamorous lifestyle, but it is very difficult to attain this level of success in fashion houses and magazines. For every one talented young photographer, hundreds are left at the sidewalk, only dreaming about the moment that their photographs will be chosen and published in a fashion publication.

Here are a few fashion photography tips for anyone looking to get started in fashion photography. The first tip is study your subject and realized that you can never learn enough. Study any and every fashion magazine you can get your hands on. There are a number of fantastic books on fashion and model photography available. Amazon.com is a great place to find some. You are going to need one or two good cameras, a tripod, and a lighting system. Always make sure that you have plenty of extra film and batteries on hand. SLR and digital cameras take different photos, so you want to choose one that is best suited for your field.

When submitting your fashion photography work, always have your portfolio on hand, in case the editor of the fashion magazine wants to see samples. When putting together your portfolio, sharp images on a 4 X 5” transparency will showcase your work best. If your work has already been published, regardless of whether it was a local newspaper, magazine, or contest, a tear sheet (literally a sheet torn from a magazine) should always be included in a portfolio. Be sure to have at least 20 photographs in your portfolio preferably with different styles.

Remember, fashion includes not only clothing, but jewelry and accessories as well. A luxurious watch from a high end manufacturer adorned on the slender wrist of a beautiful woman would make for a great fashion shoot. If you are applying for a high fashion photography job, be prepared to leave your portfolio behind for an extended period of time. I would advice you to make copies and have several extra on hand in case you need to leave yours behind for some time. This will comes in hand when showcasing your work to many different people when looking for fashion work.

In this modern of the internet, it is imperative that you display your talent as a high fashion photographer online as well. Set up a website with samples of your work. Submit your photos to online contests. Submit them to online fashion gallerys and stock image sites. This will help to get your work seen so that people can see your high fashion photography skills.

Most fashion editors are looking for your individual personality in the photographs that you take. Every fashion photographer captures the essence of the fashion item and its model in their own unique way. Therefore, you want to learn from what other successful fashion photographers are doing, but you need to develop your own unique style. The key is to set yourself from apart from others with your photos. Most importantly, if this is truly your dream, never give up. If you stay persistent and continue to learn and evolve, success will come your way.

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Fashion Photography Tips

Fashion photography is all about creativity and going that extra mile to bring in a lot of meaning to the photos. And every element of photography should be used very wisely at it. The lighting, costumes, styling, backgrounds – all need to be in perfect sync for the shoot.

  • Pre shoot preparations
    A very important lesson in fashion photography is the preparation. Be it editorial photoshoots or fashion show or a model portfolio, study the requirement very well. Understand the theme and the requirements well so that you get an idea of the subject and the theme very well. If possible, do a good research on the theme and how older photos from the theme has been. you can get clues from other photographers work and even plan your work to do better than them by not repeating what they’ve done.
  • Planning the set
    A set composes more of the background, lights used, props and the whole theme as such. Set is very important because it determines the whole mood of the shoot. you should make sure that the set is relating to the theme given to you.
  • Planning the style
    In most cases of fashion photography, you would be working with a stylist who will get you the style concept according to the theme. They will decide the dresses, the props, the make up, hair do etc of the model. Work closer with the stylist to get to know the best from her, and make sure your concept is as similar to hers or there would be differences in opinion.
  • Planning the lights
    Lighting is the most complicated in fashion photography. The colors, shades etc will all decide how successful your photo shoot is going to be. Plan it well.
  • Get your equipment ready
    Fashion photography requires the best equipment, the highest resolution camera and the most advanced digital cameras. After planning your frames make sure you have the best equipment ready.
  • Discussions with the model
    After you have well prepared everything, get to talk to your model and study their features, thin or voluptuous, boy or girl, hair type and facial type etc. This will help you a great deal in deciding what lights to use and what lenses should you carry.
  • Post shoot processes
    One of the most important points in fashion photography is the quality of your post production work. How much of photoshop you use, how well and how effectively,what filters and effect you use etc. Because Photoshop and other image editing softwares can give you that extra edge to your photos even if they are average.
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Bluff it as a fashion photographer

Chris Stevens
December 21, 2006
URL: http://www.cnet.com.au/digitalcameras/cameras/0,239036184,339272760,00.htm


Whether you’re interested in a career in fashion photography, or just want to take impressive portraits of your friends, this is your essential guide to the latest techniques that photographers are using to get their work noticed.

Want to learn straightforward techniques to shoot photographs that could be used on the cover of Cosmo or GQ? We’ll teach you how to use a basic light meter to correctly expose your photos, how to direct a model, and how to turn a good photograph into an exceptional one using the latest readily available post-production tools.

1.  The idiot
2.  Using flash
3.  Stay relaxed
4.  Be creative
5.  Pick and choose
6.  Tweak the image
7.  Choose the style
8.  Use Photoshop
9.  Print it
10. You’re a pro!

1. The idiot
So, this is you, a clueless fool with a basic digital camera. You don’t look like much in your silly hat, do you? Who’s going to let you shoot the next Kate Moss extravaganza? We need to shape you up. In this feature we’ll show you straightforward techniques to shoot photographs that could be used on the cover of Cosmo or GQ.

We’ll teach you how to use a basic light meter to correctly expose your photos, how to direct a model, and how to turn a good photograph into an exceptional one using the latest post-production tools like Adobe Lightroom, Photoshop and Apple Aperture.

You don’t need an expensive SLR to shoot fashion. A quick browse through i-D magazine proves that a point-and-shoot camera with a crude flash can sometimes be enough to capture a compelling image.

If you do have a digital SLR, such as the Nikon D80 or Sony Alpha DSLR-A100, you’ll be able to take advantage of a range of interesting effects that these cameras can produce. You’ll also be in a much better position to shoot a style of photography that’s suitable for high-fashion magazines. This is the type of photography we’ll be concentrating on here.

Photography has become astonishingly accessible, and a very capable digital SLR is more affordable than ever — certainly under AU$2,000. If you’re serious about photography, we suggest you get your hands on one. If you don’t have a digital SLR, you can still follow our tutorial, but you’ll need to be more inventive with your technique.

1.  The idiot
2.  Using flash
3.  Stay relaxed
4.  Be creative
5.  Pick and choose
6.  Tweak the image
7.  Choose the style
8.  Use Photoshop
9.  Print it
10. You’re a pro!

2. Using Flash
Photography is often described as painting with light. Although some of the mystery has been removed now that dark laboratories full of strange chemicals are no longer needed, a lot of the traditional tools are still useful. Today’s digital SLRs feature a range of light-metering options, but getting a proper, external light meter will still help you correctly expose a model when using external flash-heads.

There are two approaches here: the first is the standard method using professional full-sized flash units we describe below. The second is to simply buy a load of cheap flash heads off eBay and mess around. Because digital photography is so immediate, you won’t waste film and you can check results instantly.

Even if you’re going to experiment, it’s worth reading this section to understand the principles behind using flash in a studio.

The meter in our example is a fairly sophisticated model, but you’ll get by fine with a basic one. A light meter lets you set an ISO (film sensitivity) and shutter speed (length of exposure), and will then tell you what f-stop (amount of light) to let into the camera to correctly expose the area you’ve metered.

Don’t freak out yet! This might sound like a fairly complex operation to the newcomer, but there are some basic rules to follow with flash photography in the world of fashion. A simple way to deal with this is to set your SLR to the lowest possible ISO. With the Nikon D70 we’re using, this is ISO 200. If it’s possible with your camera, use ISO 160 or 100.

By setting the ISO low, you’re getting the best signal-to-noise ratio. Your photos will be as crisp and clean as your camera is capable of. However, these low ISOs need plenty of light to expose properly.

Next, set your shutter speed to 1/60th of a second. Now that your ISO and shutter speed are fixed, you can control the style of the photograph using the strength of the flash and measuring the required f-stop with your light meter. There are infinite ways to set up flashes around the model. Traditionally a three-point lighting system is used, but we’ve had good results with two, or nine.

Set your light meter to match your ISO (in our case 200) and shutter speed (in our case 1/60 second), then attach the light meter cable to your flash units. Now when you trigger the flash, your meter will tell you the correct f-stop for that exposure. You can then increase or decrease the intensity of your flashes to match the depth of field you want. Less light will give you a lower f-stop, and more light, a higher one.

Decide how much of the model you want to be in focus — for portraits it’s often appealing to drop focus off quite early, so that the model’s face is tightly focused on the eyes, then loses focus as the face retreats. This would mean an f-stop of something around f/2. If you’re shooting full-length shots, you’ll want to increase this to something around f/5.6 or 8.

1.  The idiot
2.  Using flash
3.  Stay relaxed
4.  Be creative
5.  Pick and choose
6.  Tweak the image
7.  Choose the style
8.  Use Photoshop
9.  Print it
10. You’re a pro!

3. Stay relaxed
You could be the best photographer in the world, but if your model is uptight, nervous or downright scared, then you’ll end up with a memory card full of dud photos.

A professional model is paid for his or her ability to relax into a shoot and inhabit a character, rather like an actor. But even professional models can require coaxing, expecially if they’re used to a different style of shoot.

Regardless of whether you’re going for a moody, dark tone to your photos — like a shoot for Dazed — or a happy, carefree look — for a mag such as Cosmo — you need the model to be relaxed.

Paradoxically, a happy model will usually be able to pull off an angry, moody look better than a unhappy one. You’ll also find that a model is more inventive when he or she is uninhibited and may come up with ideas to improve the shoot.

To lift the spirits of the model in our shoot, the photographer told amusing anecdotes and imitated a yak. You won’t always have to go this far, but remember to keep things upbeat.

Now that film is effectively free, there’s no excuse not to be spontaneous with your approach to fashion photography. Sometimes the best way to get a good photograph is to get the model to act as if he or she is being filmed, assuming multiple poses in rapid succession.

You can fire off a massive run of shots in the space of a few seconds and pick the best ones later. This will give your pictures a much more dynamic feel, as well as increasing the likelyhood of a ‘happy accident’ — the essence of many great photographs.

1.  The idiot
2.  Using flash
3.  Stay relaxed
4.  Be creative
5.  Pick and choose
6.  Tweak the image
7.  Choose the style
8.  Use Photoshop
9.  Print it
10. You’re a pro!

4. Be creative
You can use flash in all kinds of exotic ways. But what if you’re a lone photographer taking photographs on the street? You have two big problems. Firstly, you’re not going to be able to carry massive flash units with you, and secondly, there don’t tend to be plug sockets on the street that you can just borrow electricity from.

One cheap but effective technique is to buy a load of camera-mounted flash units off eBay and then string them together to create elaborate flash rigs. You can pick these old flash units up for around the price of a DVD and they’re powered by standard AA batteries (use rechargables).

Here you can see we’ve used a standard camera-mounted flash taped to a camera tripod, fired into a white umbrella. This is an extremely portable unit that can be folded up and carried in a backpack. You could use several of these to create fairly advanced lighting set-ups.

1.  The idiot
2.  Using flash
3.  Stay relaxed
4.  Be creative
5.  Pick and choose
6.  Tweak the image
7.  Choose the style
8.  Use Photoshop
9.  Print it
10. You’re a pro!

5. Pick and choose
Once you’ve shot your photographs, you’ll want to look through them to decide which ones you want to keep.

Here we’re using Apple’s Aperture software to compare various similar shots. The technique we describe is relevant to all photo software, including iPhoto, Bridge and Adobe Lightroom (which we cover in the next tip).

Start by importing all your shots into your photo software and picking the photographs you like. The shots you choose will obviously depend on the brief from your client.

In our case, we’re shooting for an imaginary magazine called Fashion. It’s looking for a quirky, unusual shot for the front cover.

Here we’re comparing a series of similar shots, and we’re also checking the detail on a shot we like. For most shots, a crisp focus on the eyes is absolutely essential, so you should check this first.

Arrange your photographs on the screen and compare shots side by side. You can now make adjustments to the colour balance of your shots and remove digital artefacts such as moire and colour fringing.

Most photo software works best if you’ve shot your material in raw format. This preserves as much basic pixel data from the original shot as possible. Only digital SLRs (and some high-end superzooms such as the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ50) use this format — compact cameras use the basic, compressed JPEG format.

1.  The idiot
2.  Using flash
3.  Stay relaxed
4.  Be creative
5.  Pick and choose
6.  Tweak the image
7.  Choose the style
8.  Use Photoshop
9.  Print it
10. You’re a pro!

6. Tweak the image
The best alternative to Aperture is Adobe Lightroom. It’s available for PC and Mac, and best of all it’s a free download (for the moment). Although the software is still technically in beta, it’s completely stable on our G5 Mac, and we’ve been using it for a lot of our photography over the last few months.

The Lightroom interface is similar to the one in Aperture. We prefer Adobe’s implementation of the loupé tool, and Aperture’s ability to organise photos. Since Lightroom is currently free, we’re going to use it to pick our final photo and tweak it into a trendy minimalist feast for the front cover of Fashion magazine.

There’s a huge number of changes you can make to photographs in Lightroom. In the top photo here we’re checking the model’s dress to make sure that the detail is sharp and there is no colour distortion. You can see that Lightroom offers a range of effect presets down the left-hand side of the screen.

These presets let you give the image a bunch of different looks for different situations — you can add your own to this list. The built-in presets provide most of the common techniques used in a traditional darkroom. One of our favourites is ‘Direct Positive’, which gives photographs an extremely vivid, surreal colour reminiscent of the hot summer days in Coca-Cola adverts.

The built-in greyscale conversion is also a very good way of transforming colour photographs into black and white. You’ll often get better results from using this method than the conventional greyscale conversion in Photoshop.

You can switch between presets, or create your own look using the sliders in the second photo here. These control elements such as colour temperature (used to correct for different lighting environments) and exposure.

The easiest way to get to grips with what you can do here is to play about with the sliders. We want a strong, punchy look to our photo with the highlights slightly blown out to emphasise the geometry of our model.

To achieve this, we’re going to up the exposure, increase the blacks (crush black tones of a specific latitude into a single dense black) and reduce vibrance and saturation slightly to give the image a colder tone.

You can achieve some impressive effects here, and in some cases correct a photograph that has been badly exposed. Ideally you want to start with a properly exposed photograph that looks as neutral as possible in-camera, and then use Lightroom to add special effects.

There are lots of other controls to tweak here. If you scroll down the right-hand panel you’ll find that you can alter how sharp the image appears — another invaluable tool. Be careful how sharp you make the picture. You’ll find that for printing on the average photoprinter it helps to slightly oversharpen the image, but for the Web you’ll want to ease off a little or you’ll see pixellation and other nasties.

1.  The idiot
2.  Using flash
3.  Stay relaxed
4.  Be creative
5.  Pick and choose
6.  Tweak the image
7.  Choose the style
8.  Use Photoshop
9.  Print it
10. You’re a pro!

7. Choose the style
There, that looks a bit more dramatic. We’ve added a sepia tint to the photo, blown out the highlights a touch and crushed the black range a fair bit using the ‘Blacks’ slider tool. Choosing a monochrome style has emphasised the model’s shape.

It’s unusual to have a front cover where the model is not looking directly into the camera — some people believe that you’re more likely to buy a magazine if it’s ‘looking’ at you — but we’re not here to appease these people, we’re here to break aesthetic boundaries. Fashion magazine is going to love this cover.

Again, it’s conventional to white out the background for front covers, but we’ve decided against this because the light shadowing behind the model gives the shot character. It also hints at a kind of spontaneous approach to the shot which makes it seem more alive.

If you did want to white out the background you have two options. The first would have been to flood the backdrop with sufficient light when you took the shot in the studio.

As long as your white background is exposed by around two stops more than your model (use your light meter) it will appear white in your photographs. Alternatively, you can use Photoshop to cut around the model.

The sepia effect gives the model’s dress a classical look, but there’s an almost infinite range of alternative possibilities. Some of them involve reshooting, others can be tested inside Lightroom by manipulating sliders.

Fashion magazine probably wants a bolder look than we’ve achieved here. Although the model looks very elegant, this sepia tone isn’t very attention-grabbing or fresh.

In this second picture we’ve tried a different approach. We’ve used a ‘Direct Positive’ preset to give the photograph some added punch. However, the flesh tone looks a bit strange: the model looks too pink.

Some of this could be filtered out using colour controls, but it seems as though any colour whatsoever is going to distract from the simple geometry of the figure.

Instead of Sepia or Direct Positive, we decide to opt for a clean, powerful black and white with heavily crushed blacks.

1.  The idiot
2.  Using flash
3.  Stay relaxed
4.  Be creative
5.  Pick and choose
6.  Tweak the image
7.  Choose the style
8.  Use Photoshop
9.  Print it
10. You’re a pro!

8. Use Photoshop
There’s still plenty of room for Photoshop in a modern fashion photographer’s workflow.

Although much of the stuff that Photoshop used to do has been taken over by tools such as Aperture and Lightroom, nothing beats Photoshop for down-and-dirty retouching work.

Here we’ve exported our photograph from Lightroom into Photoshop and cleaned up the image by removing small artefacts. We’ve then sharpened the image and boosted the contrast.

The next thing to do is add the other elements of the front cover to the graphic. We’ve used the text tool to create the magazine title and the words that describe the main features in this month’s issue.

Conventionally, you’ll supply a Photoshop file in CMYK colour to the magazine you’re working for and they’ll import this into whatever they use to layout the pages (usually InDesign or QuarkXPress).

You won’t add the magazine logo or text yourself. In our example, however, we’ll add the titles ourselves and print the file straight from Photoshop.

1.  The idiot
2.  Using flash
3.  Stay relaxed
4.  Be creative
5.  Pick and choose
6.  Tweak the image
7.  Choose the style
8.  Use Photoshop
9.  Print it
10. You’re a pro!

9. Print it
Home photo printers may seem extremely appealing, and for professional photographers they are an invaluable tool — it’s a bit like having a small film lab on your desk. Maintaining and calibrating a photo printer, however, especially a large-format printer, can be a nightmare.

If you’re serious about fashion photography, it’s still best to get your prints proofed by a professional chemist. There are several great online stores that you can upload photos to and have them delivered, printed, the next day. Their machines are carefully calibrated and will tend to give better results than a home printer.

It’s also much more expensive to print photographs at home. The expense of cartridges and paper soon adds up. If you do want a large-format photo printer, be aware that you’ll spend some of your time tinkering with it like a car mechanic. Many of us would prefer to just get on with driving.

You can see that the front cover here looks punchy and legible. The photograph is certainly quirky and there’s enough space around the edge for the designer to lay down copy around the figure.

1.  The idiot
2.  Using flash
3.  Stay relaxed
4.  Be creative
5.  Pick and choose
6.  Tweak the image
7.  Choose the style
8.  Use Photoshop
9.  Print it
10. You’re a pro!

10. You’re a pro!
Congratulations, you’re a fashion photography pro. You can attend gallery openings in Shoreditch and ogle members of the opposite sex with professional impunity. You’re second only to a rock star in the style stakes — unless, of course, you turn paparazzo, in which case you’re second only to a cockroach. But still, it’s good money either way.

While you’re chasing the dragon in the Hoxton Grill, don’t forget that even the great can fall. Keep improvising and inventing, and don’t fall into the trap of assuming that one method is the best method for all situations.

With the advent of digital SLRs the world of photography has completely changed. Not only are there more people than ever taking photographs, but the bar to entry is lower than ever. It’s no longer enough to have a massive camera and a few grands’ worth of flash equipment: you need to capture great images.

While the pretenders quake in fear at you young upstarts invading the scene, there’s never been a more exciting time to get into fashion photography and make a name for yourself. Keep your head high and your wits about you. Go little photographer, go, run into the wilds of the world and document all you see. To the stars!


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some fashion photographers:

Ruven Afanador: http://www.art-dept.com/artists/afanador/
Steven Klein: http://www.stevenkleinstudio.com/www/index.html
Camilla Akrans: http://www.lundlund.com/photographers/camilla-akrans
David Bellemere: http://www.blanpiedrubini.com/ (site down for maintenance)

http://www.flickrista.com/

Nadav Kander: http://www.nadavkander.com/
Matthew Rolston: http://www.matthewrolston.com/
Carlos Serrao: http://www.carlosserrao.com/

http://www.alexandrepichon.com/

Untitled by kevinkobek

Posted October 10 2008

On top of the world (or Los Angeles) by Amyseder

Posted October 10 2008

Untitled by kevinkobek

Posted October 10 2008

Rockstar by kevinkobek

Posted October 10 2008

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Untitled by Zuan

Posted October 08 2008

Bernies Legs 1 by JosephStory2.0

Posted October 08 2008

MARINA by Felipe Bohorquez!

Posted October 08 2008

Untitled by Sinty

Posted October 08 2008

1web by sarahlouisephotography.com

Posted October 08 2008

Sara by andreshernandez

Posted October 06 2008

One comment on “Fashion Photography

  1. Rodneysrer
    April 25, 2015

    qbldhovyzcbgtczdyuywj zfjloca rllmxde rbwxurj

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This entry was posted on October 11, 2008 by in Photography Fashion.
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